How Did Stewart Rhodes Lose His Eyes

How did Stewart Rhodes lose his eyes? Elmer Stewart Rhodes is the founder of the Oath Keepers.

This time, he was referring to Stewart Rhodes, the militia’s leader who was detained and accused of sedition this past week for his involvement in the uprising on January 6.

Rhodes is suspected of sending messages to his right-wing group with instructions on how to use force to attack the Capitol.

How Did Stewart Rhodes Lose His Eyes?

Stewart Rhodes, raised in California, enlisted in the military after high school. According to his discharge from the army, he suffered a severe injury while in training.

The Atlantic claims that Rhodes injured his left eye in 1993 after dropping a loaded firearm. After the incident, he went to college and earned his degree with honors from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He then went on to Yale Law School, where he excelled academically.

How Did Stewart Rhodes Lose His Eyes
Stewart Rhodes giving a speech at an event. Source: KWTX

Before working as a clerk for Arizona Supreme Court Justice Michael Ryan, he worked in Washington, D.C., for former U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, a Republican from Texas. In response to Paul’s unsuccessful 2008 campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, Rhodes founded the Oath Keepers.

2010 saw Rhodes move his legal practice to Montana, where he had a license to practice. Over the years, Rhodes’ Montana addresses in Big Arm, Kalispell, and Trego have been cited in court documents.

Stewart Rhodes Injury And Health Update

What happened to Stewart Rhodes’ eye injury? Why did he cover his eyes? No, a study by the Atlantic found that the harm began in 1993.

According to the post, Rhodes, a former firearms instructor, dropped a loaded handgun, which accidentally shot him in the face and caused him to lose vision in his left eye. According to his account, the incident motivated the then-28-year-old to enroll in community college.

How Did Stewart Rhodes Lose His Eyes
Stewart Rhodes speaks in Wichita falls. Source: Times record news

Little else is known about the event, and until the inquiry by author and journalist Mike Giglio for the Atlantic, it hardly ever appeared in biographies or stories about Rhodes.

So there you have it, Stewart Rhodes, the founder of Oath Keepers, didn’t always look like a comic book supervillain. It all started with a catastrophic shooting accident.

Where Is Stewart Rhodes Now jail Or Prison?

Stewart Rhodes was a bright Yale Law School alumnus before he put together one of the most prominent far-right anti-government militia groups in American history before his Oath Keepers attacked the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.

His unique life trajectory—a brief term as an Army paratrooper cut short by a training accident, then marriage, education, and an Ivy League law degree—helped him land a clerkship on the Arizona Supreme Court. The clerkship was a step up after a difficult beginning. But Rhodes seemed furious and resentful rather than like he belonged.

Tuesday’s hearing will not feature Rhodes, 57, as an attorney. The Justice Department’s most criminal severe accusation in its extensive prosecution of rioters who attacked the Capitol is a seditious conspiracy, which he and four other individuals connected to the Oath Keepers are facing.

How Did Stewart Rhodes Lose His Eyes
Stewart Rhodes Indicted for Seditious Conspiracy Source: Law & Crime

If found guilty, the charge carries a maximum 20-year prison sentence. According to Rachel Carroll Rivas, interim deputy director of research with the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, the trial will shed light on the covert organization Rhodes founded in 2009 that has expanded to include thousands of claimed members and loosely organized chapters across the nation.

According to Rhodes’ estranged wife, Tasha Adams, the job will be at odds with the tremendous role he had long envisioned for himself.

Read More: Bongani Mavuso Death: How Did Ukhozi FM Radio Presenter Died? Wife And Net Worth

Author

I've discovered that writing has been the most therapeutic to me. Writing is something I began in a state of helplessness, but it has always been and will remain to be my real savior.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *